.

.

Saturday, 28 March 2020

Special News--April 2020

Global Integration Updates
Special News--April 2020
Issue 46
View this email in your browser

Global Integration Updates
Common Ground for the Common Good 
Be the people we need--Build the world we need

Special News--April 2020
Confronting COVID-19
Be smart--Be safe--Be kind
Updates and information--Coping and mental health
 

We are at war with a virus – and not winning it. It took the world three months to reach 100,000 confirmed cases of infection. The next 100,000 happened in just 12 days. The third took four days. The fourth, just one and a half. This is exponential growth and only the tip of the iceberg. This war needs a war-time plan to fight it. Solidarity is essential....Allow me to highlight three critical areas for concerted G-20 action...UN Secretary-General António Guterres, G-20 Virtual Summit, 26 March 2020
-----------
In this Update we share some of the growing number of resources in the world community's battle to confront the corona virus. The resources provide you with information and updates as well as suggestions for coping and maintaining mental health, etc. Two of the main sources for resources that we feature are the World Health Organization and the United Nations.

Underlying, overarching, and intermingled with all of these resources is this simple yet crucial message from the United Nations: "Be smart. Be safe. Be kind." To this message we intermingle our own, as people of faith: "Don't fear. Trust God. Do good."

Warm greetings (from France and USA),
Kelly and Michèle

     
  
Featured Resources
Confronting COVID-19

Be smart--Be safe--Be kind
Updates and information--Coping and mental health


WHO Situation Dashboard26 March 2020, 1800 CET
(expand the image for easier viewing and click on the link for updates)
The pandemic continues to take a massive toll not just on health, but on so many parts of life….We have overcome many pandemics and crises before. We will overcome this one too. The question is how large a price we will pay. Already we have lost more than 16,000 lives. We know we will lose more – how many more will be determined by the decisions we make and the actions we take now. To slow the spread of COVID-19, many countries have introduced unprecedented measures, at significant social and economic cost – closing schools and businesses, cancelling sporting events and asking people to stay home and stay safe….The point of these actions is to enable the more precise and targeted measures that are needed to stop transmission and save lives....There are six key actions that we recommend…WHO Director-General Dr Tedros, Media Briefing, 25 March 2020
----------
Two Main Sources of Information
Be smart--Be safe--Be kind
World Health Organization
Special Section on the Corona Virus
Updates, protecting your health, country/technical guidance, travel advice, situation reports, scam alerts, etc.

Examples:
Advice for the Public--Protecting Yourselves
Advice for Health Workers
Mental Health and Psychosocial Considerations


  
Be Smart--Be Safe--Be Kind
Example of social media posters, UN
(expand the images for easier viewing or go to website)



More Resources
• Practical advice in many areas, resources for the community, etc.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (USA)

• Corona virus and your wellbeing 
Mind UK

 Interim notices for humanitarian settings
UN IASC

• Talking to your children about the corona virus pandemic
Mental Health Foundation

• How teenagers can protect their mental health
UNICEF (many resources)

• Resources relevant to non-communicable diseases
NCD Alliance (cardiovascular, diabetes, cancer, respiratory, mental health)

• Working remotely/at home
DisasterReady (short online course, free--need to register) 

• Visualizing the history of pandemics and The history of pandemics
Virtual Capitalist (14 March 2020)

 The end of epidemics
Dr. Jonathan Quick (recent interviews, recommendations, book)


• Pastoral Letter about the corona virus
World Council of Churches (18 March 2020)

Don't fear. Trust God. Do good.


Perspective from C.S Lewis
The Normalcy of the Novelty
In one way we think a great deal too much of the atomic bomb. “How are we to live in an atomic age?” I am tempted to reply: “Why, as you would have lived in the sixteenth century when the plague visited London almost every year, or as you would have lived in a Viking age when raiders from Scandinavia might land and cut your throat any night; or indeed, as you are already living in an age of cancer, an age of syphilis, an age of paralysis, an age of air raids, an age of railway accidents, an age of motor accidents.”
In other words, do not let us begin by exaggerating the novelty of our situation. Believe me, dear sir or madam, you and all whom you love were already sentenced to death before the atomic bomb was invented: and quite a high percentage of us were going to die in unpleasant ways. We had, indeed, one very great advantage over our ancestors—anesthetics; but we have that still. It is perfectly ridiculous to go about whimpering and drawing long faces because the scientists have added one more chance of painful and premature death to a world which already bristled with such chances and in which death itself was not a chance at all, but a certainty.
This is the first point to be made: and the first action to be taken is to pull ourselves together. If we are all going to be destroyed by an atomic bomb, let that bomb when it comes find us doing sensible and human things—praying, working, teaching, reading, listening to music, bathing the children, playing tennis, chatting to our friends over a pint and a game of darts—not huddled together like frightened sheep and thinking about bombs. They may break our bodies (a microbe can do that) but they need not dominate our minds.
C.S. Lewis, On Living in an Atomic Age (1948)
Present Concerns: Journalistic Essays 


 
Member Care Associates
MCAresources@gmail.com

 
Member Care Associates Inc. (MCA) is a non-profit, Christian organization working internationally from Geneva and the USA. MCA's involvement in Global Integration focuses on the wellbeing and effectiveness of personnel and their organizations in the mission, humanitarian, and development sectors as well as global mental health, all with a view towards supporting sustainable development for all people and the planet. Our services include consultation, training, research, developing resources, and publications.

Click on these items below to access our:
 Member Care UpdatesGlobal Integration Updates,
member care booksand recent MCA publications.

 
Global Integration (GI) is a framework for actively and responsibly engaging in our world--locally to globally. It emphasizes connecting relationally and contributing relevantly on behalf of human wellbeing and the issues facing humanity, in light of our integrity, commitments, and core values (e.g., ethical, humanitarian, human rights, faith-based). GI encourages a variety of people to be at the “global tables” and in the "global trenches"--and everything in-between--in order to help research, shape, and monitor agendas, policies, and action for all people and the planet. It intentionally links building the world we need with being the people we need.
*****
Global Integration Issues 
Special News, Updates, and Initial Communiques

 
--Special News: January 2018-current (25+ issues)
--Updates 2015-2017 (18 issues) examples:
Essential Review (index)--
December 2017
Helping the Helpers--October 2017
Everyday Heroes--August 2017
Doomsday--June 2017
Living in Global Integrity--April 2017
Peace and Security--December 2016

Global Citizenship--June 2016
Faith-Based Partners in Transformation--August 2015
--Initial Communiques: 2013-2015 (20 email-letters to colleagues)

The GI Updates are designed to help shape and support the emerging diversity of global integrators who as learners-practitioners are committed to the "common ground for the common good." The image at the top of the Update (global pearl) is a cover detail from our edited book, Global Member Care (volume 2): Crossing Sectors for Serving Humanity (2013). William Carey Library. 
 
--Share the Updates with your colleagues and networks.
--Sign up easily here: 
http://eepurl.com/cldqbD
Copyright ©2020
Member Care Associates, Inc.


GI Updates are archived:

http://membercareassociates.org/?page_id=726
 
MCA main website
www.membercareassociates.org

Global Mental Health-Map
https://sites.google.com/site/gmhmap

MCA email:
MCAresources@gmail.com
Thanks for sharing the GI Updates
 with your colleagues and networks.


Sign up easily: 
http://eepurl.com/cldqbD
 
Disclaimer: The inclusion of the materials in the GI Updates as well as the recommendations and opinions expressed in these materials do not necessarily reflect their endorsement. The responsibility for the interpretation and use of the materials lies with the reader.

Friday, 13 March 2020

Special News--March 2020

Global Integration Updates
Special News--March 2020
Issue 45
View this email in your browser

Global Integration Updates
Common Ground for the Common Good 
Be the people we need--Build the world we need


Special News--March 2020
Stories from the Sectors
Desperate Journeys, Embodying Change, Awake at Night


Vietnamese refugees. South China Sea, 1980
Source: UN photo, G. Klijn/UNHCR


No one chooses to be a refugee, to leave everything behind for an uncertain future. But, while wars continue to rage, others like [my sister, Sara] and me will feel compelled to make similar decisions. And when people fleeing such violent situations and making such desperate journeys reach Europe we should all play our part in making sure they receive the help and support they need to quickly rebuild their lives.” Yusra Mardini, Desperate Journeys
-----------------
In this Update we share short stories primarily from the overlapping humanitarian and human rights sectors. The stories are personal accounts and interviews, written and audio, primarily of people and helpers involved in forced migration.

Many of the stories include tragic elements--misery, exploitation, trauma, and death. Others are more reflections on humanitarian issues. What emerges collectively is a pattern of common elements needed to sustain people in harsh circumstances: things like protection, practical care, work, school for children, resilience, hope, faith, and courage.

We share the stories now, in the context of the growing corona virus pandemic, as an additional reminder to us all that behind the statistics regarding the "major issues facing humanity" lie fellow humans. People who could be--or even are--our own family members. Our neighbors. Ourselves. And we share the stories to spur us on to informed, collaborative action, with empathy and compassion, including addressing the underlying and reinforcing causes of conflict (e.g., Five Core Commitments in the 
Agenda for Humanity). inequalities (e.g., recommendations in the Human Development Report 2019: Beyond Income...), and health emergencies (a broad focus of WHO's Global Health Observatory).

Have a read. Have a listen. There's lots to take in. Let the stories transport you into people's lives, experiences--their world...and your own.

 See also:
Warm greetings from Geneva,
Kelly and Michèle

     
--Share your comments and resources on our
MCA Facebook page
--Send us your ideas and resources for future GI Updates 

MCAresources@gmail.com



Featured Resources
Stories from the Sectors
Desperate Journeys, Embodying Change, Awake at Night


Amo neniam pereas.
Love never ceases.
Desperate Journeys: Refugee and Migrant Children Arriving in Europe and How to Strengthen Their Protection. UNHCR (2019). "Yusra Mardini is a UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador. Yusra was selected to swim competitively at Rio 2016 as part of the first ever Refugee Olympic Team."

“In 2015, I was 17, a high school student dreaming of representing my country at international swimming events. As the impact of the war in Syria came closer, and after we were forced to abandon our home in Darayya, my older sister Sara and I took the decision to travel to Europe. We hoped to be able to bring our mother and our younger sister, Shahed, to safety too. As we were leaving, Shahed clung to us, sobbing, and begging us not to go.

It’s only around 10km from the Turkish coast to the north coast of the Greek island of Lesvos. In August 2015, Sara and I boarded a dinghy along with 18 others, including families with children. We all knew that many people had died making the journey ahead. We were all equally afraid. But we were all equally desperate to escape the violence. Like most of the boats that made that same crossing, ours was dangerously overcrowded. In that deceptively short stretch of sea, our engine failed.

The wind was blowing hard and our boat was being tossed and spun about on the waves. The light was fading. Sara and I were experienced swimmers but others on the boat were not. We took turns in the water, making the boat lighter and helping turn it to face the waves to prevent it from capsizing. We called for help but no one came.


The memory of that sea journey will remain with me always. For over three hours we swam. Everyone was praying. At last, the engine spluttered back to life and we reached the shore. I struggle with this story, to understand why we made it when many others didn’t.  Each time I hear about a group drowning at sea, it takes me back there, clinging to the boat’s rope, desperately treading water.” 
(excerpt from the Foreword)


--”My brother and I had to leave Afghanistan because we received threats. Some members of my family were even killed. It took us one month to reach Greece. The bad memories from this journey still haunt me. We saw people dying in front of our eyes – either because they got injured or because of exhaustion. I still remember everything very vividly. I will never forget. During the day, we stayed hidden in the woods, without any food or water, and during the night we walked along unknown roads. We met bandits along the way; they would ask about our religion and our destination and then they would take things from our bags and pockets. Whoever resisted was beaten. They also had guns...” (J. age 17, page 11)
----------

--"I was 13 when I left Somalia (in February 2017). From Somalia, I escaped by car to Ethiopia. I was with a friend. We did not have any money but someone took us. We arrived in a place in Ethiopia. It was very scary and dangerous there and then we were kidnapped, it was like trafficking. We did not have a choice. They made us cross to Sudan on foot. From there, we were taken in a truck to somewhere in Kufra, Libya. We could not see where we were going during the journey…” (
A. age 15, age 14)




Change Making Women: Global Stories of Change, Activism, Healing and Growth“We are a Podcast about women interested in how we create change in the world..We are committed to talking about the things we often don’t talk about (like menstrual bleeding, miscarriage and grief). We share music, ideas and healing practices to inspire you. We also talk about aid, funding and philanthropy and how to make them better. And we talk to the women leading change in their communities, organisations and initiatives about what they do and how they do it.” (80 podcasts, 2016-current)
---------
 
Guest Series: Embodying Change 4. “In this conversation, Melissa Pitotti talks with Nasra Ismail, Director of the Somalia NGO consortium. They talk about wellbeing in the context of the localisation agenda in humanitarian aid and why conversations about wellbeing require us to consider our privilege and to think about our work in radically new ways.” (3 February 2020)
 

Guest Series: Embodying Change 3. “In this conversation, Melissa Pitotti talks with Kate Gilmore, the United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights. They talk about wellbeing in the UN system and other humanitarian and human rights work, about how Kate sees the connections between personal and political and some tangible  ways she has tried, in her role, to do things differently.e.” (12 December 2019). 



Awake at NightUNHCR

Awake at NightUNHCR. A Podcast with Melissa Fleming (2018-2019). "What does it take to be a humanitarian worker in some of the world’s most difficult and dangerous locations? To find out, Melissa Fleming meets them." (listen to the four minute overview for the series--currently 14 episodes-podcasts)

"UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency…is launching the podcast at a time when refugee numbers around the world are hitting new highs and humanitarian work is becoming more dangerous. In these intimate interviews, men and women who have worked in war zones reveal for the first time in public some of their deepest fears and the emotional wounds they carry. Our goal is to give listeners insight into the people who serve the victims of war on the frontline."
----------
Darkness Does Weird Things to You, interview with Vincent Cochetel  (Season 1, Episode 1—the first podcast). “Vincent Cochetel has worked for the UNHCR for over 30 years. He spent the first part of his career listening to the horror stories of other people but then his own life became a nightmare. In 1998 when he was working in the Caucasus in southern Russia he was kidnapped and held hostage for 317 days. During Vincent’s captivity he was made to record several ransom demands.”
“[I was] handcuffed to a metallic cable that is tied to a bed so that gives me little margin of movement around the bed on one side of the bed. Enough to make four footsteps and you get used to that. It was dark. Darkness was more difficult to cope with than limited freedom of movement. Darkness is something that is oppressive.”
UN photo, Trygve Bølstad/UNHCR
Home is the People Around You, interview with Abida Qasim (Season 2, Episode 7—the latest podcast). “Adiba Qasim is from the Yazidi minority in Northern Iraq. In August 2014, her village was stormed by Islamic State militants who killed and enslaved thousands of Yazidis. Adiba and her family managed to escape just before the militants arrived. She was 19 years old.”
“At 7:00 in the morning, relatives called my father and said: ‘We are now coming to the North, because the Islamic State at 3:00 in the morning attacked us and many people have been killed and it is very difficult. So, run away! Get out of your house’!”
“She was haunted by the knowledge that many of her friends and relatives were taken captive by Islamic State – and held as sex slaves. Some survived – and when they were freed, Adiba was there to help.”

UN photo, Qasim/UNHCR


Member Care Associates
MCAresources@gmail.com

Member Care Associates Inc. (MCA) is a non-profit, Christian organization working internationally from Geneva and the USA. MCA's involvement in Global Integration focuses on the wellbeing and effectiveness of personnel and their organizations in the mission, humanitarian, and development sectors as well as global mental health, all with a view towards supporting sustainable development for all people and the planet. Our services include consultation, training, research, developing resources, and publications.

Click on these items below to access our:
 Member Care UpdatesGlobal Integration Updates,
member care booksand recent MCA publications.

Global Integration (GI) is a framework for actively and responsibly engaging in our world--locally to globally. It emphasizes connecting relationally and contributing relevantly on behalf of human wellbeing and the issues facing humanity, in light of our integrity, commitments, and core values (e.g., ethical, humanitarian, human rights, faith-based). GI encourages a variety of people to be at the “global tables” and in the "global trenches"--and everything in-between--in order to help research, shape, and monitor agendas, policies, and action for all people and the planet. It intentionally links building the world we need with being the people we need.
*****
Global Integration Issues 
Special News, Updates, and Initial Communiques

--Special News: January 2018-current (25+ issues)
--Updates 2015-2017 (18 issues) examples:
Essential Review (index)--
December 2017
Helping the Helpers--October 2017
Everyday Heroes--August 2017
Doomsday--June 2017
Living in Global Integrity--April 2017
Peace and Security--December 2016

Global Citizenship--June 2016
Faith-Based Partners in Transformation--August 2015
--Initial Communiques: 2013-2015 (20 email-letters to colleagues)

The GI Updates are designed to help shape and support the emerging diversity of global integrators who as learners-practitioners are committed to the "common ground for the common good." The image at the top of the Update (global pearl) is a cover detail from our edited book, Global Member Care (volume 2): Crossing Sectors for Serving Humanity (2013). William Carey Library. 
--Share the Updates with your colleagues and networks.
--Sign up easily here: 
http://eepurl.com/cldqbD
Copyright ©2020
Member Care Associates, Inc.


GI Updates are archived:

http://membercareassociates.org/?page_id=726

MCA main website
www.membercareassociates.org

Global Mental Health-Map
https://sites.google.com/site/gmhmap

MCA email:
MCAresources@gmail.com
Thanks for sharing the GI Updates
 with your colleagues and networks.


Sign up easily: 
http://eepurl.com/cldqbD
Disclaimer: The inclusion of the materials in the GI Updates as well as the recommendations and opinions expressed in these materials do not necessarily reflect their endorsement. The responsibility for the interpretation and use of the materials lies with the reader.

Special News--February 2020

Global Integration Updates
Special News--February 2020
Issue 44
View this email in your browser

Global Integration Updates
Common Ground for the Common Good 
Build the world we need--Be the people we need

Special News--February 2020
Wellbeing for Who?
Reports from Seven Sectors

Staying Current with Our Global Goals



Image from Global Peace Index, Institute for Economics and Peace
 
We resolve, between now and 2030, to end poverty and hunger everywhere; to combat inequalities within and among countries; to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies; to protect human rights and promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; and to ensure the lasting protection of the planet and its natural resources. We resolve also to create conditions for sustainable, inclusive and sustained economic growth, shared prosperity and decent work for all, taking into account different levels of national development and capacities. Transforming Our World, The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, paragraph 3 (2015)
-----------------
 
In this Update we feature recent global reports from seven overlapping sectors. The purpose? To help us all track with the ongoing issues, progress, and challenges in the global efforts on behalf of the wellbeing of all people and the planet.
 
Who is benefiting? Who is being left behind?

We also orient you to these reports so that you can overview them easily and then decide if you want to probe them more deeply. See the Summary/link at the end of each report.

We suggest that when you can: a) look over the descriptions below; b) go deeper by taking 30 minutes to review the summaries for all seven items (possibly longer if English is not your first language); and c) choose one or more of the reports of interest and probe it further.

 
Stay current. Stay the course.
Build the world we need. Be the people we need.
 

Warm greetings from Geneva,
Kelly and Michèle

 
     
--Share your comments and resources on our
MCA Facebook page
--Send us your ideas and resources for future GI Updates 

MCAresources@gmail.com
 

Featured Resources
Reports from Seven Sectors
Staying Current with Our Global Goals



Image courtesy and ©2019 ENOD

To say, "Your side of the global boat is sinking," is crazy.
We are all on the same precarious, perilous, precious global boat.
 
1. Global Action Plan for Healthy Lives and Wellbeing for All (2019) World Health Organization. "Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3 – ensuring health and well-being for all at all ages – is critical to achieving progress on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Because health is an integral part of human capital and a precondition, driver and outcome of sustainable development, SDG 3 is linked to around 50 health-related targets across the SDGs and the pledge to leave no one behind. The overall objective of the Global Action Plan is to enhance collaboration among 12 global organizations engaged in health, development and humanitarian responses to accelerate country progress on the health-related SDG targets. The Plan presents a new approach to strengthening collaboration among and joint action by the organizations, building on an initial joint commitment made in October 2018. The Plan is primarily intended to be strategic but provides some operational detail to guide implementation while also allowing flexibility for adjustment based on regular reviews of progress and learning from experience. Although the purpose of the Global Action Plan is not to provide or seek additional resources, the Plan will enable better use of existing resources as a result of improved collaboration, recognizing that each agency has its own unique mandate and area of expertise." (excerpt from WHO website)

Summary: See the Executive Summary (xiv-xxv).
See also: WHO Updates for the Global Action Plan and other health updates on the  WHO website.
 
 
2. Global Humanitarian Overview 2020UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). “We began 2019 expecting humanitarian needs to be similar to those of 2018. We were wrong. Climatic shocks, the unexpected spread of infectious disease, and the impact of protracted and often intensifying conflicts have combined to drive needs to unprecedented levels this year. Over the course of the year, I met people suffering through these crises in more than 10 countries, among them Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Somalia, Sudan, Venezuela and Zimbabwe. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, I heard from families whose lives had been changed forever by the Ebola virus outbreak, with loved ones lost – a situation only made worse by decades of insecurity, conflict and chronic poverty. In the Bahamas, I saw firsthand the devastating impact a severe hurricane – made more intense by climate change – can have on homes and livelihoods across nearly an entire country. I continue to be amazed by people’s determination to rebuild, and encouraged by their hope for a better future. I am humbled by the tireless dedication and professionalism of humanitarian staff working on the front lines of human suffering, often at significant personal risk.”  (excerpted from the Foreword)

Summary: See the Overview (pages 4-5)
See also: Agenda for Humanity website for references and research related to humanitarian assistance as well as the Executive Summary of the 2019 Synthesis Report (Sustaining the Ambition, Delivering Change). See also humanitarian updates and reports from The New Humanitarian.

3. World Development Report 2020: Trading for Development in the Age of Global Value Chains, The Word Bank Group. “Global value chains (GVCs) powered the surge of international trade after 1990 and now account for almost half of all trade. This shift enabled an unprecedented economic convergence: poor countries grew rapidly and began to catch up with richer countries. Since the 2008 global financial crisis, however, the growth of trade has been sluggish and the expansion of GVCs has stalled. Meanwhile, serious threats have emerged to the model of trade-led growth. New technologies could draw production closer to the consumer and reduce the demand for labor. And conflicts among large countries could lead to a retrenchment or a segmentation of GVCs. [This Report] examines whether there is still a path to development through GVCs and trade. It concludes that technological change is at this stage more a boon than a curse. GVCs can continue to boost growth, create better jobs, and reduce poverty provided that developing countries implement deeper reforms to promote GVC participation, industrial countries pursue open, predictable policies, and all countries revive multilateral cooperation.” (description from website)

Summary: See Overview (pages 1-9)
Note: What is a GVC? A global value chain breaks up the production process across countries. Firms specialize in a specific task and do not produce the whole product. How do GVCs work? Interactions between firms typically involve durable relationships. Economic fundamentals drive countries’ participation in GVCs. But policies matter—to enhance participation and broaden benefits.” (excerpt from thee Overview and summary diagram)


4. Human Development Report 2019: Beyond Income, Beyond Averages, Beyond Today--Inequalities in Human Development in the 21st Century, UN Development Program. “The wave of demonstrations sweeping across countries is a clear sign that, for all our progress, something in our globalized society is not working. Different triggers are bringing people onto the streets: the cost of a train ticket, the price of petrol, political demands for independence. A connecting thread, though, is deep  and rising frustration with inequalities. Understanding how to address today’s disquiet requires looking “Beyond Income, Beyond Averages and Beyond Today,” as this Human Development Report sets out to do. Too often, inequality is framed around economics, fed and measured by the notion that making money is the most important thing in life. But societies are creaking under the strain of this assumption, and while people may protest to keep pennies in their pockets, power is the protagonist of this story: the power of the few; the powerlessness of many; and collective power of the people to demand change.” (excerpt from the Foreword)

Summary: See Overview (pages 1-4)
Note: The entire Overview is from pages 1-20.


5. Corruption Perceptions Index 2019, Transparency International. (access Report at bottom of home page via download) “[This year's Index] reveals a staggering number of countries are showing little to no improvement in tackling corruption. Our analysis also suggests that reducing big money in politics and promoting inclusive political decision-making are essential to curb corruption. In the last year, anti-corruption movements across the globe gained momentum as millions of people joined together to speak out against corruption in their governments. Protests from Latin America, North Africa and Eastern Europe to the Middle East and Central Asia made headlines as citizens marched in Santiago, Prague, Beirut, and a host of other cities to voice their frustrations in the streets. From fraud that occurs at the highest levels of government to petty bribery that blocks access to basic public services like health care and education, citizens are fed up with corrupt leaders and institutions. This frustration fuels a growing lack of trust in government and further erodes public confidence in political leaders, elected officials and democracy. The current state of corruption speaks to a need for greater political integrity in many countries. To have any chance of curbing corruption, governments must strengthen checks and balances, limit the influence of big money in politics and ensure broad input in political decision-making. Public policies and resources should not be determined by economic power or political influence, but by fair consultation and impartial budget allocation.” (excerpt from the Executive Summary)

Summary: Executive Summary (pages 4-5)
See also: The 
overview video (1.5 minutes) of the Report and the overviews/info graphics on the Transparency International website main page.
 
6. Positive Peace Report 2019: Analyzing the Factors that Sustain PeaceInstitute for Economics and Peace. “Positive Peace is a transformational concept. Empirically based, it shifts the focus away from the negative to the positive aspects that create the conditions for a society to flourish. Due to its systemic nature, improvements in Positive Peace are associated with many desirable outcomes for society, such as higher GDP growth, better measures of wellbeing, higher levels of resilience and more peaceful societies. More importantly, it provides a theory of social change, and explains how societies change and evolve. Humanity is nearing a tipping point and facing challenges unparalleled in its short history. Many of these problems are global in nature, such as climate change, ever-decreasing biodiversity, depletion of the earth’s freshwater, and overpopulation. Such global challenges call for global solutions and require cooperation on a scale unprecedented in human history. In a hyper-connected world, the sources of many of these challenges are multidimensional, increasingly complex and span national borders. For this reason, finding solutions requires fundamentally new ways of thinking.” (page 10)

Summary: See Executive Summary and Key Findings (pages 12-14)
See also: The opening overview of why Positive Peace is transformational (pages 3-11) as well as the Institute for Economics and Peace's Global Terrorism Index 2019.
7. Report of the Secretary-General on the 2019 Climate Action Summit and the Way Forward in 2020. United Nations. "The Climate Action Summit reinforced 1.5°C as the socially, economically, politically and scientifically safe limit to global warming by the end of this century, and net zero emissions by 2050 as the global long-term climate objective for all. Countries need to urgently accelerate work to define what this entails for the short-term (2020) and mid-term (2030) commitments that will be captured in their Nationally Determined Contributions and ensure the alignment of strategies to meet those commitments.

The Summit demonstrated that the full participation of governments, business leaders, subnational actors, indigenous peoples, youth and other civil society stakeholders was critical to raising ambition for climate mitigation and adaptation. Together, they launched transformative initiatives in twelve critical areas that will provide the foundation for action going forward to reduce emissions and strengthen adaptation and resilience.results are achieved.

Strong action was particularly evident from the private sector and youth. Many businesses showcased ambitious commitment compatible with a 1.50C pathway, in many cases going beyond current national policy frameworks, even in sectors heavily reliant on fossil fuels. The voices of youth and the “climate strikers” were brought into the global discussion, both at the Youth Climate Summit and the Climate Action Summit.

Political leadership was also demonstrated during the Summit with the commitments of 70 countries to deliver more ambitious NDCs in 2020 in line with net zero emissions by 2050 strategies. While these countries represent a significant portion of the world’s population, they account for less than 10 percent of the world’s GHG emissions. If none of the major emitters formally committed to more ambitious NDCs, some of them “committed to commit” by the end of 2020. Finally, 75 countries committed to deliver 2050 net zero emissions strategies by 2020.

Through concrete examples, the Summit highlighted how climate action can have tangible impacts on people’s lives, including on their jobs and health, and therefore the need to align policies and systems to accelerate the implementation of both the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).”
 (excerpt page 5)

Summary: Call to Action (page 3)
See also: The entire Report (pages 1-11) and the 
UN Climate Action website.



Member Care Associates
MCAresources@gmail.com

 
Member Care Associates Inc. (MCA) is a non-profit, Christian organization working internationally from Geneva and the USA. MCA's involvement in Global Integration focuses on the wellbeing and effectiveness of personnel and their organizations in the mission, humanitarian, and development sectors as well as global mental health, all with a view towards supporting sustainable development for all people and the planet. Our services include consultation, training, research, developing resources, and publications.

Click on these items below to access our:
 Member Care UpdatesGlobal Integration Updates,
member care booksand recent MCA publications.

 
Global Integration (GI) is a framework for actively and responsibly engaging in our world--locally to globally. It emphasizes connecting relationally and contributing relevantly on behalf of human wellbeing and the issues facing humanity, in light of our integrity, commitments, and core values (e.g., ethical, humanitarian, human rights, faith-based). GI encourages a variety of people to be at the “global tables” and in the "global trenches"--and everything in-between--in order to help research, shape, and monitor agendas, policies, and action for all people and the planet. It intentionally links building the world we need with being the people we need.
*****
Global Integration Issues 
Special News, Updates, and Initial Communiques

 
--Special News: January 2018-current (25+ issues)
--Updates 2015-2017 (18 issues) examples:
Essential Review (index)--
December 2017
Helping the Helpers--October 2017
Everyday Heroes--August 2017
Doomsday--June 2017
Living in Global Integrity--April 2017
Peace and Security--December 2016

Global Citizenship--June 2016
Faith-Based Partners in Transformation--August 2015
--Initial Communiques: 2013-2015 (20 email-letters to colleagues)

The GI Updates are designed to help shape and support the emerging diversity of global integrators who as learners-practitioners are committed to the "common ground for the common good." The image at the top of the Update (global pearl) is a cover detail from our edited book, Global Member Care (volume 2): Crossing Sectors for Serving Humanity (2013). William Carey Library. 
 
--Share the Updates with your colleagues and networks.
--Sign up easily here: 
http://eepurl.com/cldqbD
Copyright ©2020
Member Care Associates, Inc.


GI Updates are archived:

http://membercareassociates.org/?page_id=726
 
MCA main website
www.membercareassociates.org

Global Mental Health-Map
https://sites.google.com/site/gmhmap

MCA email:
MCAresources@gmail.com
Thanks for sharing the GI Updates
 with your colleagues and networks.


Sign up easily: 
http://eepurl.com/cldqbD
 
Disclaimer: The inclusion of the materials in the GI Updates as well as the recommendations and opinions expressed in these materials do not necessarily reflect their endorsement. The responsibility for the interpretation and use of the materials lies with the reader.